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Today's Health Headlines
VIENNA (Reuters) - The cultivation of opium poppy in Afghanistan, the world's main source of heroin, has risen to its third-highest level in more than 20 years, the United Nations confirmed on Sunday, as the Taliban insurgency gains ground.

(Reuters) - Former Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, in an opinion editorial published in the Los Angeles Times, on Friday urged Californians to approve a November ballot measure aimed at reining in pharmaceutical prices.

LONDON (Reuters) - GlaxoSmithKline has filed its shingles vaccine Shingrix for U.S. regulatory approval, the drugmaker said on Monday, bringing the potential $1 billion-a-year seller a step closer to market.

NEW DELHI (Reuters) - The World Medical Association (WMA), the top medical-ethics body, on Friday installed an Indian doctor facing corruption charges as its president, despite controversy surrounding his appointment while legal cases are pending.

GENEVA (Reuters) - Two companies making vaccines to help the world eradicate polio are failing to produce enough, so many countries should prepare to give lower doses to make stocks last, a group of experts has advised the World Health Organization.

(Reuters) - Merck & Co Inc said its immunotherapy, Keytruda, helped previously treated patients with advanced bladder cancer live longer in a late-stage study, prompting an independent monitoring panel to recommend stopping the trial early.

(Reuters) - Health insurer Cigna Corp has discontinued its policy of requiring doctors to seek authorization before treating opioid addicts, as part of a fight against an epidemic of opioid abuse, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said on Friday.

(Reuters Health) - Heart attack survivors who participate in cardiac rehabilitation programs may survive longer, but feel no healthier, than they would without this follow-up care, a U.S. study suggests.

Reuters - The increased risk of stroke that comes with smoking may extend to nonsmokers who live in the same household and breathe in secondhand smoke, a U.S. study suggests.

(Reuters Health) - People with type 1 diabetes often develop other autoimmune disorders, such as thyroid and gastrointestinal diseases, and a recent study yields new information about this link.