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Today's Health Headlines
LA JOLLA, Calif. (Reuters) - One of the earliest tasks in President Barack Obama's $215 million "precision medicine" program will be finding a way to piece together data from a hodgepodge of existing studies, said Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health.

(Reuters) - The Republican-controlled West Virginia legislature on Friday banned abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy, overriding the governor's veto and joining 11 other states in prohibiting abortion at that point.

Even if they haven't been diagnosed with heart disease, diabetics with classical heart-risk factors like smoking and elevated “bad” cholesterol are at heightened risk of serious heart-related “events” and death, according to a new study.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration this week issued a mobile app specifically for searching for information about drug shortages.

(Reuters) - Incoming students at Ohio State University's Columbus campus will be required to provide proof of vaccinations for measles and a number of other communicable diseases starting in August, a school spokesman said on Friday.

Stretches that work several muscle groups at once are great for upper-body warm-ups before a workout, an Australian study finds.

(Reuters) - U.S. health regulators on Friday approved Japanese drugmaker Astellas Pharma Inc's drug for the treatment of two rare, often fatal invasive fungal infections that target patients with blood cancers.

(Reuters) - Doctors at a San Francisco hospital began a final round of kidney transplant surgeries on Friday in a rare organ-transplant chain from living donors that will result in healthy kidneys going to six sick people.

NEW YORK (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Diseases spread through dirty water and poor sanitation are the fifth biggest killer of women worldwide, causing more deaths than AIDS, diabetes or breast cancer, researchers say.

It’s an office tradition that can create camaraderie, boost morale and provide escape from daily routine. March Madness pools are estimated to attract more than 50 million workers to bet on brackets as the NCAA men’s basketball tournament begins this month. But for the approximately five million people with a gambling addiction, the next few weeks can present temptation, or torture.

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